Action Packed Open Day at Shrewsbury Fire Station

At Shrewsbury Fire Station's annual 2018 open day is firefighter Sam Dawes with Benjamin (6) and Hannah Bradley (10) with Bullseye, a replica horse used to train firefighters in animal rescues.
At Shrewsbury Fire Station's annual 2018 open day is firefighter Sam Dawes with Benjamin (6) and Hannah Bradley (10) with Bullseye, a replica horse used to train firefighters in animal rescues.
20th August, 2018

 

Hundreds of visitors attended an action packed open day at Shrewsbury Fire Station which raised more than £600 for the Fire Fighters charity.

Vivid demonstrations and displays throughout the day helped to get over important messages to the public about fire safety, road safety and how everyone should always have a smoke alarm in the home, said organiser Neil Maguire, Watch Manager on Red Watch at the Shrewsbury station.

A series of practical demonstrations of firefighter skills and a vast array of equipment showed visitors how people are rescued in emergencies with advice for the public on how to prevent house fires and general safety precautions.

Special fire appliances and rescue equipment were at the open day at the St Michael Street station on Saturday, August 18.

“I want to thank everyone who came and all those who worked really hard to make it an extremely successful day, in particular firefighter Keith Woodville who contributed greatly to the organising,” said Neil.

On call firefighters from Shrewsbury and Church Stretton alongside colleagues from the animal rescue unit at Wellington brought specialist equipment to show how they carry out rescues.

Flames ripped out from a chip pan in an eye catching fire safety demonstration, firefighters soared 32 metres skyward on the Aerial Ladder Platform, and there were simulated rescues from crashed cars with firefighters using cutting equipment to free the drivers.“The road traffic collision demonstrated a cyclist and a car showing the importance of cycle helmets, seat belt wear and the danger of using mobile phones,” said Neil.

Visitors saw the “smoke house” where firefighters wearing breathing apparatus showed how they carry out rescues.

A smoke tent replicating how smoke fills a house in a fire revealed how important it is for members of the public to have their own fire plan for their home, the necessity of smoke alarms on each floor and how to prevent fires.

The action continued with a team from the Midland Cave Rescue who recreated a tunnel so children could experience “going underground.”

British Red Cross volunteers, who help victims in the immediate aftermath of a house fire were also at the open day as well as local street pastors who help people get home safely if they have too much to drink on a night out. Visitors were also able to speak to the motorcycle couriers from Blood Bikes, stored at Shrewsbury Fire Station, which are used to quickly transport blood and other emergency medical items.

“These annual open days give the public the chance to see the range of skills and activities that their local firefighters and other lifesaving organisations have and we were pleased to get over some important safety and prevention advice.

“We are also proud to have raised so much for the Fire Fighters Charity which supports firefighters and their families.”

He praised the operator of a Playbus at the event, who gave up his time for free, who raised £155 for the charity with 155 children enjoying the activity at £1 a visit.

 

Firefighter Chris Davey shows Joe Sheridan (9) and Tabitha Bridgman (12) the special cutters used to rescue people from road traffic collisions.
The Aerial Ladder Platform (ALP)begins its ascent.
The ladder shows how high firefighters can go to carry out rescues.
Visitors to the open day watch the ALP in action above Shrewsbury Fire Station

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